Wednesday, 9 September 2020

NVI Postage Values Updated

Following the recent postage rate changes detailed here it is worth repeating and updating this post from September 2019.  Updates are highlighted in red.


It is over six years since we first had to consider the change in letter weight steps and the question of stamps pre-printed with obsolete weights.  A reader asked the question on the latest Revenue Protection post so I've given this important subject it's own entry on the blog.


The question was:
There is another issue, as touched on, in that what postage rate do some of the perfectly legal NVIs and earlier Post & Go stamps now pay. A number of the original rates no longer exist.
I assume an "E" value will probably still pay the Europe rate of up 20g. Where is this set out, either for the public or the Royal Mail staff?
We have Overseas booklet stamps showing Worldwide postcard rate? Originally apparently 43p. What does that pay for today? Ditto Europe up to 40g - no longer a published postage rate. Worldwide up to 40g & 60g likewise both as booklet stamps and/or Post & Go values. Europe up to 60g and so on.
Does anyone know whether the answer set out anywhere or where the contact point is to enquire?
The answer is buried deep in a blogpost of April 2014, so I'll repeat and expand on it here.
UPDATE 10 April 2014
Regarding the future value of obsolete Post and Go stamps Royal Mail have advised:

Existing P&G stamps for WW 10g and WW40g and other previously issued NVI’s for which there is no current postage value e.g. WW Postcard, will continue to be valid for the next applicable weight step up from its stated value i.e. WW 10g stamp will be valid at the WW 20g value and the WW 40g stamp will be valid at the new WW 60g value.
Although they were asked specifically about Post and Go stamps, the reply covers the self-adhesive booklet stamps, including the airmail postcard rate stamp, which is the same rate as the Europe 20g/World 10g. The following year the 60g step was replaced by the 100g step and the same principle applied.  In other words, the stamps showing 40g are now valid for 100g.  The 10g and 20g stamps are still valid for the weights shown, as before.


Users of Stanley Gibbons' Great Britain Concise catalogue will know that the introduction includes some tables of postage rates.  One which was* missing is this table which, apart from indicating the original selling price of some of the stamps, explains why certain definitive stamps were issued and, in the case of the £2.25, re-issued after being replaced.  (Included in the 2020 catalogue.)


Europe 20g
World 10g
World 20g
World 40g
April 2009
56p
62p
90p
-
April 2010
70p
67p
97p
£1.46
April 2011
68p
76p
£1.10
£1.65
April 2012
87p
£1.28
£1.90
April 2013
88p
£1.28
£1.88

E20/ W10
Europe 60g
World 20g
World 60g
April 2014
97p
£1.47
£1.28
£2.15

E20/ W10
Europe 100g
World 20g
World 100g
April 2015
£1
£1.52
£1.33
£2.25
April 2016
£1.05
£1.52
£1.33
£2.25
April 2017
£1.17
£1.57
£1.40
£2.27
April 2018
£1.25
£1.55
£1.45
£2.25
April 2019
£1.35
£1.60
£1.55
£2.30
April 2020
£1.42
£1.68
£1.63
£2.42
Sept 2020
£1.45
£1.70*
£1.70*
§

* With effect from 1 September 2020 a combined Euro 100g/World 20g Post & Go stamp was issued, priced at £1.70.
On the same date the World 100g stamp was replaced by two stamps: World 100g Zone 1-3 is sold for £2.50, and World 100g Zone 3 is £2.55.


Consequently previous Europe 100g and World 20g stamps may be used for £1.70-worth of postage, and World 100g stamps may be used for £2.55, the higher rate.




I hope readers find this useful.  It is probably worth reminding everybody that these are also all valid at the rates shown for inland postage, just as the 2nd, 1st, Large, Signed For, and Special Delivery stamps are all valid for services other than those shown and on inland and international mail.

Update 19 October.
I've compiled this table which I believe to be correct.  Note that some of the rates were in effect before the stamps were issued, and some new stamps were issued at old rates before tariff increases. 

Stamps Issued* or Rates Effective
1st Signed For 100g
1st Large Signed For 100g
100g Special Delivery
500g Special Delivery
17 November 2009 *
£1.14
£1.36
-
-
6 April 2010
£1.15
£1.40
-
-
26 October 2010 *


£5.05
£5.50
20 April 2011
£1.23
£1.52
£5.45
£5.90
30 April 2012
£1.55
£1.85
£5.90
£6.35
2 April 2013 §
£1.70
£2.00
£6.22
£6.95
31 March 2014
£1.72
£2.03
£6.40
£7.15
30 March 2015
£1.73
£2.05
£6.45
£7.25
29 March 2016
£1.74
£2.06


27 March 2017
£1.75
£2.08


26 March 2018
£1.77
£2.11
£6.50
£7.30
25 March 2019
£1.90
£2.26
£6.60
£7.40
23 March 2020
£2.06
£2.45
£6.70
£7.50


* Royal Mail Signed For stamps were issued 27 March 2013, replacing Recorded Signed For, but were sold at old rates until 2 April.



The latest reply from Royal Mail, forwarded by Rushstamps, stated:
I have been advised the NVI stamps which have the E on can be used for both inland and Europe postings and the value of the stamp would be the current cost of an International Standard to Europe, which at this time would be £1.35.  NVI stamps do not have an expiry date and are valid at the current rate of postage, as long as they are unused stamps.
I believe the issue is that the Post Office Counter staff were not aware of this and is why they were refusing to accept these stamps.


2 comments:

  1. I often wonder if Royal Mail have done a survey of how much revenue has been lost on NVI stamps. For an example my friend bought a roll of 100 1st class when the rate was 60p for 20g, I know he is still using them, so he must have saved quite a bit, now if many others have done the same then RM have missed out on £1000'S surely, In my humble opinion it would have been advantageous to stop the NVI and issue stamps at the correct postal rate.

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  2. Petemk's friend might not have bought 100 stamps if he hadn't had the knowledge that they would be valid indefinitely!

    I doubt RM have missed out on £1000s. Virtually every stamp sold by RM to a collector goes straight into an album or stockbook without going anywhere near the mail system. So far from missing out, RM profit vastly and have done so for years, without having to provide a service of any kind.

    Stop NVI stamps? What next, stop the use of older mint stamps because they haven't been used within the prescribed period of the particular correct postal rate! I don't think so.

    On a separate point. I found the tables above very helpful thank you. Do you have any idea of the value of the NVI Worldwide postcard stamps (SGU2357a) which don't seem to feature in the tables above>

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