Monday, 14 December 2020

2021 programme - first issue 14 January

This brief note acknowledges that Royal Mail's standing order customers know already what no dealers or cover producers are allowed to mention until 5 January - the identity and make up of the first issue of the year.

So although I will allow comments, none here will mention the name of the issue.   I'm sure you all appreciate the position we are in: I was tempted to write 'understand' but nobody really understands why Royal Mail can tell the collectors but not the wider public.


12 comments:

  1. Identity? My guess would be a person or persons, rather than for example, celebrating British flora and fauna. A populist issue?

    Will they look really nice on envelopes? Can you see the general public buying them to use instead of stamps from booklets (in non-Covid times)?

    Is it an issue to cause grumblings amongst stamp collectors? Will it be the last straw for some?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1. No, but popular in some areas

      2. only if they are aware of them. People who buy from supermarkets and card shops won;t know

      3. only because it's another 10-stamp set and the first of the new prices.

      Delete
  2. Not received my notification yet, maybe today

    ReplyDelete
  3. 1. It's the Brexit issue isn't it :-) Johnson, Gove, Raab, Rees-Mogg et al with a "Great Speeches of Farage" minisheet...

    2. I think that's an interesting point. I do make a point of aiming for special stamps on letters and cards; not everyone is prepared (or able) to make the effort of a PO trip when booklets are available closer to home. Presumably, that's part of the thinking of the 4Machin+2Special booklets; it reminds people there are other designs to be had.

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    Replies
    1. 1. No comment

      2. That was certainly the original thinking. Unfortunately the booklets are not usually distributed to Post Office branches with the special stamps, but when the branch next needs replenishment. Depending on volumes restocked, and sales levels, the branch may not get every special booklet.

      By the time any particular booklet is received, the special stamps may have been sold out or returned to the warehouse.

      Delete
    2. And if the booklets are being sold in another outlet (card shop, corner shop, supermarket) it will be even more haphazard as to what you get. Unless the shop owner is interested enough to notice... which I have seen exactly once that I can recall.

      Delete
  4. "nobody really understands why Royal Mail can tell the collectors but not the wider public".
    Left hand and right hand again, I would imagine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Collectors who pay by Direct Debit must legally be told the next charge and what it is for (using code words if necessary, as with Project Apollo).

      The PR/marketing department are quite convinced that they get better coverage in the press, especially local newspapers/websites, if they have a concerted push on one particular day. Normally they release news about the next year's issues between Christmas and New Year, when the news is quiet. Not that that's likely to be the case this year, with Covid & Brexit vying for headlines. Relegated to page 94, I think.

      Delete
  5. We don't know what is coming out on the 14th January(I do I think!!)but I do know what is being Issued for anyone who collects Hong Kong I have received
    a leaflet with Issues up till 22nd June next year, RW

    ReplyDelete
  6. Royal Mail recently tweeted that their focus for the future is to be a parcels business - seems that letters are secondary to them now. Lost count of how many times I've gone to my Post Office to send Christmas cards overseas and the clerk doesn't even bother to use real stamps and just prints off a label. Some clerks are very obliging if you ask for real stamps whilst others seem to think you're very strange asking for them.
    The hike in international postcard postage from £1.42 to £1.45 this year and then to £1.70 from January makes you wonder if Royal Mail are driving up prices to lower demand so that they don't have to bother with non parcels etc.....just my own wonderings!

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    Replies
    1. The sad reality is that letters are nearly obsolete. I’ve lived in Singapore and Hong Kong for nearly 20 years now and I’ve seen letter volume dwindle. In the last 12 months I’ve received none - everything is online and I’ve put a block on junk mail. The only person who sends postcards is my 80 year old mum (but I love receiving them!) I don’t receive Christmas cards from anyone under 50 anymore. Is it sad, yes, but also inevitable. I’m honestly amazed commemorative stamps are still issued. 30% of all collectors come from China now.

      Delete
    2. Quite a few of us are trying to slow the decline in letters. Although I've had responses that penpalling is for children (and the same has also been applied to stamp collecting)... I find I mentally do not feel lonely/isolated. I do miss writing letters in public (a cafe, for example), but even though I sit alone - I do not feel it (I look around me and see people sharing tables but they instead of communicating with or looking at each other, they are looking down at their devices....).

      Have you sent any letters? There's a thing on Postcrossing (maybe your mother would like that, sending/receiving postcards globally...) - I send, therefore I receive. I might send more letter than I receive, but I really like this method of connecting with people around the world.

      I send quite a few cards at this time of year, both within the UK and to overseas. I like to buy from charities, but why are most of them square? Do you send Christmas cards to anyone under 50?

      Delete

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